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Fresh Ginger Gingerbread

Makes 12 servings

I think you’re really going to like this light and tender gingerbread. When we developed the recipe, it occurred to us that this is probably pretty much how gingerbread tasted back in the days before you could buy little jars of ground dried ginger roo

Find this recipe and more in Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Tastes.

ingredients
¼ cup minced fresh ginger, in all
3 large eggs
½ cup sugar
1 cup cane syrup, or your favorite syrup
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, cut into pats about 1 tablespoon each
1 (8-ounce container) sour cream
2½ cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
vegetable oil spray
how to prepare

Preheat the oven to 325°.

 

In a small saucepan over high heat, make a ginger tea as they do in the Orient:  bring 1 cup of water to a boil and add 2 tablespoons of the ginger.  Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes, then add the remaining 2 tablespoons of ginger and continue to simmer until the liquid is thick and syrupy, and is reduced to about ½ cup, about 20 to 25 minutes.  If too much water evaporates, add a little more as necessary—try to gauge the amount so that you end up with ½ cup syrup.  Adding the ginger at different times during the simmering will give two different ginger tastes.  Set aside to cool to room temperature.

 

In a blender whip the eggs for 30 seconds, then add the sugar and whip until they are well mixed and frothy, another 30 seconds.

 

In the bowl of a kitchen mixer equipped with a paddle attachment, place the cane syrup and the butter and mix at slow speed until combined.  Add the egg/sugar mixture and the sour cream, and mix until combined.  Slowly beat in the flour and soda, then beat in the ginger syrup.

 

Lightly and evenly spray a 9-inch by 13-inch by 2-inch baking pan with vegetable oil spray and spread the batter in it.  Bake until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean, about 40 minutes.  Let cool slightly on a cake rack before cutting into 12 rectangles to serve.

Copyright© 2000 by Paul Prudhomme

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